The exhibition includes artwork from three painting series by the artist.

Memories: In and Out of Time

In and Out of Time is a mixed media painting series in which the artist considers the power of family memories to transport the viewer to another time and place. Using copies of old family photographs, acrylic paint, and specialty papers, she creates textured spaces in which observers can be present in the past. By doing so, she invites the viewer to reminisce about their own experiences growing up back in the day. Fragments of Maya Angelou's poem, of the same name, is embedded within the painting.

Ancestry: Of Blood and Bones 

Using precious photos of relatives from the family tree as reference, the artist explores not only family resemblances among her ancestors, but also painting techniques that combine the abstract serendipitous flow of poured paint with realistic portraits. The visual drift and movement creates a pensive place in which to reside as viewers meet the ancestors face to face. Selected for this exhibition are the Langston’s of Virginia from the artist’s maternal side. James Henry (Great-Great Grandfather), his wife Primmie and their two daughters Pearline and Maggie (Great Grandmother). Included also are James Henry’s brother, Jesse, who was captured by the Confederate army even though he was a “free man of color”1 and Jesse’s son, the Reverend Robert Jackson Langston.

1 Letter written to Thomas Pratt Turner (1841–1900) as commander of Confederate military prisons in Richmond and includes a letter from Daniel Brinkley of Nansemond County requesting the release of Jesse Langston, a free Negro.

History: Toiling Upward

The inspiration for this body of work stems from the artist’s intrigued with jobs held by kin in her family tree, such as, tobacco stemmer, coal miner, fishmonger, grocer, etc. She refers to it as her “post-runaway” series and is curious about how folks earned a living once they were emancipated. While researching historical context of her subjects, she made the fortuitous discovery of Dr. Cater G. Woodson’s and Lorenzo J. Greene’s book, “Negro Wage Earners”, in which they described many of the jobs and conditions under which free African Americans worked post-slavery. The title of the series is from a poem written by one of America’s favorite poets, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, who was an abolitionist and author of many poems in which slavery was subject. The poem, “The Ladder of St. Augustine”, reads in part: “The heights by great men reached and kept | Were not attained by sudden flight, | But they, while their companions slept, | Were toiling upward in the night.”

 

Shows and Openings

The Dr. Carter G. Woodson African American Museum Presents an Exhibition by CORA MARSHALL Roots & Branches & Blooms An Exploration of Family Ancestry, History, and Memories July 14, 2018 – September 30, 2018 Opening Reception: July 14, 2018 5 PM – 9 PM Second Saturday ArtWalk St. Petersburg
Please join us for our Opening Reception; Dia de Los Muertos, A Celebration of Life" curated by St Petersburg-based artist, Mark Noll. I was one of the 100+ artists invited to do a Sugar Skull (mine's called Brown Sugar Lady) for the show. Boy, was that fun! Plus, it's a fundraiser for the children's program (which appeals to the teacher in me). I also submitted an entry for the national juried show and work from my "In and Out of Time" mixed media series was accepted. April 6, 5:30- 8:30 p.m. Opening reception Come during the exhibition for parties, lectures and face painting. May 26, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Closing reception
Strokes of Luck SOFT WATER STUDIOS 515 22nd Street South, Saint Petersburg, Florida, 33712 03/17 Closing Show (St. Patty’s Day) 5-9 PM
OPENING RECEPTION Wednesday, March 14, 2018 5 pm - 8 pm | Awards 6 pm Exhibition Dates March 5 - April 5, 2018 Suntan Art Center 3300 Gulf Blvd. St. Pete Beach, FL 33706

Roots and Branches and Blooms: An Exhibition by Cora Marshall

7/1/2018

The exhibition includes artwork from three painting series by the artist.

Memories: In and Out of Time

In and Out of Time is a mixed media painting series in which the artist considers the power of family memories to transport the viewer to another time and place. Using copies of old family photographs, acrylic paint, and specialty papers, she creates textured spaces in which observers can be present in the past. By doing so, she invites the viewer to reminisce about their own experiences growing up back in the day. Fragments of Maya Angelou's poem, of the same name, is embedded within the painting.

Ancestry: Of Blood and Bones 

Using precious photos of relatives from the family tree as reference, the artist explores not only family resemblances among her ancestors, but also painting techniques that combine the abstract serendipitous flow of poured paint with realistic portraits. The visual drift and movement creates a pensive place in which to reside as viewers meet the ancestors face to face. Selected for this exhibition are the Langston’s of Virginia from the artist’s maternal side. James Henry (Great-Great Grandfather), his wife Primmie and their two daughters Pearline and Maggie (Great Grandmother). Included also are James Henry’s brother, Jesse, who was captured by the Confederate army even though he was a “free man of color”1 and Jesse’s son, the Reverend Robert Jackson Langston.

1 Letter written to Thomas Pratt Turner (1841–1900) as commander of Confederate military prisons in Richmond and includes a letter from Daniel Brinkley of Nansemond County requesting the release of Jesse Langston, a free Negro.

History: Toiling Upward

The inspiration for this body of work stems from the artist’s intrigued with jobs held by kin in her family tree, such as, tobacco stemmer, coal miner, fishmonger, grocer, etc. She refers to it as her “post-runaway” series and is curious about how folks earned a living once they were emancipated. While researching historical context of her subjects, she made the fortuitous discovery of Dr. Cater G. Woodson’s and Lorenzo J. Greene’s book, “Negro Wage Earners”, in which they described many of the jobs and conditions under which free African Americans worked post-slavery. The title of the series is from a poem written by one of America’s favorite poets, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, who was an abolitionist and author of many poems in which slavery was subject. The poem, “The Ladder of St. Augustine”, reads in part: “The heights by great men reached and kept | Were not attained by sudden flight, | But they, while their companions slept, | Were toiling upward in the night.”